Don’t Skip Breakfast, It May Lead To Weight Gain; New Study

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New finding shows skipping breakfast can disturb the body’s internal clock and cause weight gain, even if one does not overeat for the rest of the day. Skipping breakfast has been linked with obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease, but the precise impact of meal times on the body’s internal clock wasn’t as clear up until now.

The research conducted by The Hebrew University and Tel Aviv University in Israel found that the effect of breakfast on the expression of “clock genes” regulates the post-meal glucose and insulin responses of both healthy individuals and diabetics.
 

Research has revealed that people who skip breakfast miss out on important nutrients like calcium and fibre.
 

Research has revealed that people who skip breakfast miss out on important nutrients like calcium and fibre. Skipping breakfast makes you turn to nibbling during the day, and this is usually on unhealthy snacks. Waiting long before eating can make you feel peckish, leading to unhealthy food choices. Your body’s sugar level drops during the night, and skipping breakfast makes it drop even lower. This leaves you sluggish and hungrier. Without a nutritious breakfast to kick-start the day, your trans fat and cholesterol levels get even lower.

“Proper meal timing — such as consuming breakfast before 9:30am  — could lead to an improvement of the entire metabolism of the body, facilitate weight loss, and delay complications associated with type 2 diabetes and other age-related disorders.”

In addition to improving glucose metabolism, breakfast is also likely to improve fat metabolism — that is, the way fat is transported and broken down in the blood, and used in cells.

Study co-author Dr. Keith Tolfrey from the Loughborough University said: ‘There is a common belief that breakfast is the “most important meal of the day”. However, around one third of children and adolescents in many countries skip breakfast regularly.’

There are many reports that show missing breakfast is associated with obesity, which may have led to premature assumptions that breakfast can be used as an intervention for weight control.

‘But we do not know why eating breakfast is associated with a lower likelihood of being overweight or obese, or whether eating breakfast can be used effectively as a weight-control strategy.’

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